ASK THE AGRONOMIST BLOG

Stine’s Ask the Agronomist blog is your source to the latest information from our expert team, including advice and insight on field practices, product recommendations, planting and harvest updates, new technologies, crop management, innovative research and information about how to keep your farm operation running smoothly year round. 

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    Stine Harvest Roundup: Part 2

    November 01, 2017

    Posted by Stine Seed in Harvest

    Last week, we featured harvest updates from Stine Regions 2, 3, 7, 8 and 10. This week, Stine Regions 4, 5, 14, 17, 18 and 20 share their updates. From Kansas and the Delta South to Ohio and Illinois, Stine RSAs are seeing great results from Stine numbers this year.

    Region 4 (northwest Iowa and eastern Nebraska)
    RSA Todd Schomburg reports that the recent weather has moved harvest forward quickly. Soybean harvest is 95 to 100 percent complete, with corn harvest around 50 to 75 percent finished. As you go north and west in Region 4, corn harvest is a bit slower because those areas have had more rain the last few weeks.

    Region 5 (southern Nebraska, southwest Iowa, northeast Colorado)
    RSA Chad Kuehl says Region 5 had a late start to harvest but they’re probably 75 percent finished. The last week and a half brought some challenges with weather and strong winds, sometimes gusting up to 50+ miles per hour along with some light snow.

    Chad has heard a lot of positive things about our Stine® LibertyLink® and Stine GT soybeans, especially with Stine 26BA32 and 28BA02. On the corn side, it’s been another great year for Stine 9734 and 9808E, which have been very consistent and reliable over the past few years. 

    Region 14 (Tennessee, southeast Missouri, east central Arkansas, north central Mississippi, northern Alabama and parts of Louisiana)
    RSA Kevin Ryan reports that corn harvest in the mid-South is almost complete. Corn yields have been average to slightly above average. Higher-than-expected yields were seen in conventional and glyphosate-tolerant corn as compared to insect-traited corn. Insect pressure may have been less this year, but profitability per acre on non-insect-traited acres was higher than expected. More growers are seeing the benefits of increasing populations, narrowing row spacing and adding corn to their crop rotation.

    Soybean harvest varies widely from 30 percent complete in the northern region to 90 percent complete in southern areas, such as Louisiana and the Delta South. Soybean yields have been well above average and, in most cases, better than expected. Some disease pressure from early rains or late hurricane rain caused yield reductions in a few cases. Soybean yields of all traits and conventional varieties seem much more consistent. There appears to be little or no correlation in yield by trait. Overall, we are extremely positive on soybean yields across the board in the mid-South.

    Region 17 (west central and southeastern Indiana, central and southern Ohio and parts of Kentucky)
    RSA Doug Score reports that Region 17 has approximately 40 percent of the corn shelled and 85 percent of the soybeans cut. With the cool/wet forecast continuing, we will likely see minimal progress this week.

    Most of the region dealt with a worst-case scenario growing season, with damaging rains throughout the first half of the growing season. This was followed by very little precipitation the last half of the growing season. So, growers who spent money on field drainage are reaping their rewards this fall. Many field average yields are affected by the percent lost to flooding or saturated soils. Considering those obstacles, Doug notes he’s impressed with Stine genetics and the products’ abilities to overcome these challenges. 

    Region 18 (southwest Indiana, northwest Kentucky and southeast Illinois)
    RSA Jason Green says harvest is in full swing in all three states of Region 18. With the recent turn in the weather, soybean harvest has slowed down and most farmers are putting corn in the bin. Soybean harvest is about 70 percent complete. Yield from the early soybeans has been outstanding in all areas. Leading the way are Stine 36LE32 and 38LE02 in the LibertyLink lineup. Also, the new Stine GT lineup stands out, with Stine 34BA20 leading the pack.

    Corn harvest is about 50 percent complete in Region 18. Yields have been very good in places that received timely rains. A Stine master plot was taken out in early September in western Kentucky with an average yield of 250 bushels per acre. Strong performers have been Stine 9709, 9714 and 9808E. 

    Region 20 (southwest Iowa, northwest Missouri, southeast Nebraska and northern Kansas)
    RSA Darrin Petty reports that harvest is off to a slow start because of rain. Soybean yields coming in so far are very good, with Stine 20RD20s averaging 75–80 bushels per acre, 28BA02s averaging 76–80 bushels per acre, 26BA32s averaging 74–76 bushels per acre, 25LH62s averaging 75 plus bushels per acre and 31LE32s averaging 69–75 bushels per acre. Stine GT and LibertyLink beans look very good. 

    Not much corn has been taken out, so yields are slowly coming in, and they look competitive so far. Corn is looking great in northwest Kansas with very little rain there this year, especially Stine 9728E-G, 9808E-G, 9734E-20, 9734-20 and 9734-0 brand corn hybrids. Dry land and irrigated corn in north central Kansas are doing very well, with Stine 9734-20, 9734-G and 9538-20 standing out. Once the region dries out, everyone will be running hard. 

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    Stine Harvest Roundup

    October 25, 2017

    Posted by Stine Seed in Harvest

    Harvest updates are starting to come in across Stine’s sales territories. While many regions are off to a slow (and wet) start, yield results look promising, and many Stine numbers are really standing out this year.

    Region 2 (North Dakota, northern South Dakota and western Minnesota)
    RSA Katie Lorenz reports that Region 2 is nearly complete with soybean harvest and growers are heading straight into corn harvest as the weather continues to cooperate. Soybean yields were average this year because of heavy early spring rains and a summer dry spell, but Stine genetics continue to showcase top yield. Growers seem to be particularly excited about the new Stine GT soybeans and the latest lineup of Stine LibertyLink® soybeans.

    Corn is rolling through the combines now and showing excellent late-season health and standability. The yields are overall higher than expected, and plots are showing impressive numbers. Stine 9101-G and 9202-G stand out as early hybrids, and 9212-10 and 9316-20 are proving to be outstanding late- season hybrids.

    Region 3 (southern South Dakota, northern Nebraska and southwest Minnesota)
    RSA Tony Lenz reports that Region 3 received five to seven inches of rain in late September and early October, but growers have made great strides with harvest in southwest Minnesota, southern South Dakota and northern Nebraska since then.

    The latest USDA NASS crop progress report shows as high as 83 percent of soybeans harvested in Minnesota to 26 percent of the corn harvested in Nebraska. Region 3 should be wrapping up soybeans this week with some wet fields left that seem to be slowing the process down, especially in southern South Dakota. They’ve seen up and down yield results, especially in areas that had a lot of hail this summer.

    Tony notes they have been very satisfied with yields from the Stine LibertyLink, Stine GT and Genuity® Roundup Ready 2 Yield® traits. They have taken out a few corn plots and have seen record yields on those plots with some great yields from Stine 9814-11, 9739E-20, 9427-20 and 9436-G brand corn. Corn harvest should be at full strength at the end of October in Region 3.

    Region 7 (southeast Iowa and northeast Missouri)
    RSA John Furlong notes that Region 7 is getting a strong start on harvest. Variability is the main word, but in general, yields are better than what producers were expecting. For John, he had his first 300-bushel yield. His Stine 9808E-G brand corn field hit 300.2 bushels per acre in a plot in southeastern Iowa, and Stine 9714-G brand corn was not far behind at 284 bushels per acre. He notes that several Stine soybean varieties look good, especially in the early maturities. This includes Stine 26BA23, 29RI02 and 28BA02 brand soybeans. They haven’t taken any LibertyLink plots out yet, but Stine 26LH02, 29LJ02 and 31LE32 are doing great in field comparisons.

    Region 8 (north and central Missouri)
    Stine RSA Mike Eckels reports that Region 8 has experienced wet weather for the past few weeks. Mike estimates that 70 percent of corn is harvested, with a couple of corn plots still to come out. He notes he had a farmer plant an 80-acre field at 38,000, which averaged 246 bushels per acre. The grower plants 20-inch rows and was very happy with Stine’s corn hybrids.  

    On the soybean side, Mike estimates that around 40 percent is harvested and that, overall, yields have been very good.

    Region 10 (southeast Minnesota and northeast Iowa)
    RSA Tony Pleggenkuhle notes that Region 10 is about 75 percent complete with soybean harvest and 30 percent complete with corn. For soybeans, Stine 20RD20s, 19BA23s and 25LH62s are pulling in the top yields. For corn, Stine 9428-32, 9635SS and 9537E-21 are performing well. Soybean conditions look good where there was rain in August. Overall, corn is much better than expected.

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    Advantages of Stine’s HP Twin 20 Planting System and an Early Canopy in Corn

    October 18, 2017

    Posted by Chad Kuehl in High-Population Corn

    It’s never too early to start planning for the 2018 planting season. By now, growers should have received their Stine seed catalogs and talked to their agronomists about what’s worked well for them in 2017 and how to carry that over to the next year. For Region 5, which covers southern Nebraska and parts of western Iowa and northeastern Colorado, we’ve seen a lot of success and interest in the Stine® HP Twin 20 planting system. 

    This year, more than 12,000 acres were planted with the Stine HP Twin 20 planting system in southern Nebraska. This success has registered for farmers who are not only pushing populations on irrigated land but also on dry land.

    One advantage of the Stine HP Twin 20 planting system is more equidistant spacing. With that, being able to push the population means that you’re going to canopy the ground sooner, which means you’re going to have less weed pressure later on in the season. Another advantage is that you’re going to see is cooler temperatures in the rows on hot days. When it’s 100 plus degrees, you can see up to a 15-degree difference when it comes to the Twin 20-inch system compared to wider 30-inch rows.

    Other advantages of an early canopy in corn include light interception and erosion control. An early canopy keeps sunlight where it matters the most — on a corn plant’s leaves. This enables the plant to maximize every ray of sunlight and drop of rain during the critical late spring and early summer growing season. And one of the lesser-known benefits of the HP Twin 20 planting system’s early canopy is erosion control. When a raindrop hits the soil directly, soil particles bubble up and can be carried away. That’s not as likely to happen when raindrops first hit a thick canopy of corn leaves. The Stine HP Twin 20 planting system helps prevent channels of water running down rows, which means the soil particles stay put.

    To learn more about the benefits of the Stine HP Twin 20 planting system, visit our website or talk to your local Stine sales rep.